Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

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Note: This is a repost of a blog post originally written in November 2016.

My dad died two weeks ago.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

Please don’t tell me how lucky I am.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

Please don’t tell me how lucky I am that he died suddenly. Yes, I am glad that I did not have to see him suffer. But I never had the chance to say goodbye. To him, or to my mom and uncle two years ago. He was dead, alone, for almost a week. And no one even knew.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

Please don’t tell me that I am lucky that my sister will soon have a baby, bringing joy to the family in a time of sadness. Yes, I am looking forward to meeting her baby. But her having to give birth to a child, for a second time, just weeks after losing a parent is simply unfathomable. And yet, it is somehow true.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

Please don’t tell me that I am lucky to have children, to help keep my mind off of it. Yes, they certainly keep me busy. But seeing their pain at the loss of their last grandparent is almost more than I can bear.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

Please just tell me that you are sorry that we are going through this again… so soon… so young.

Please do not just sweep my pain under the rug and suggest that I just focus on the positives in my life to make everything better. The positives do not make losing a parent any less painful.

They will, with time, make their loss easier to bear.

But not today.

It is too soon.

Please, let me have time with my pain.

Even if it makes you uncomfortable.

Please Don’t Tell Me How Lucky I Am…

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Lindsay Lapaquette

Lindsay Lapaquette

Lindsay Lapaquette, M.Sc.(A) works with middle managers who want to communicate authentically so they can effectively lead their teams without losing themselves. As a former Speech-Language Pathologist, Lindsay applies her expertise in the neuroscience of communication and connection to help managers foster an environment of trust and respect in their teams, so that everyone can bring their best selves to work.

Lindsay’s approach has been profoundly influenced by her work with First Nations organizations, her experience as a parent to two neurodivergent children, and the premature loss of both of her parents. These experiences have taught Lindsay great lessons about the power of excellent people skills that extend well beyond her professional expertise.

Lindsay Lapaquette

Lindsay Lapaquette

Lindsay Lapaquette, M.Sc.(A) works with middle managers who want to communicate authentically so they can effectively lead their teams without losing themselves. As a former Speech Language Pathologist, Lindsay applies her expertise in the neuroscience of communication and connection to help managers foster an environment of trust and respect in their teams, so that everyone can bring their best selves to work.

Lindsay’s approach has been profoundly influenced by her work with First Nations organizations, her experience as a parent to two children with pervasive mental health challenges, and the premature loss of both of her parents. These experiences have taught Lindsay great lessons about the power of excellent people skills that extend well beyond her professional expertise.

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Leadership communication skills to elevate team performance.

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